Organizations Involved in the Rescue of German Jewish Children

Because of the economic difficulties caused by the Great Depression, it was imperative to assure federal, state, and local governments that German Jewish refugee children would not become dependent on public relief once they arrived in the United States. Consequently, a number of organizations assisted in bringing the children to America and providing for their welfare once they disembarked. Some of the most important of these groups are described below.

National Organizations

Local Organizations

National Organizations

Delegates from the AFSC who set up a relief operation in Toulouse, France, January, 1941.

Delegates from the AFSC who set up a relief operation in Toulouse, France, January, 1941.

Courtesy of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
Photograph of an emergency session of the American Jewish Congress in May 1933.

Photograph of an emergency session of the American Jewish Congress in May 1933.

Courtesy of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Local Organizations

Postcard of the Hebrew Orphans Home in Atlanta, early twentieth century.

Postcard of the Hebrew Orphans Home in Atlanta, early twentieth century.

    Hebrew Orphans Home - Originally known as the Hebrew Orphans Asylum, the Hebrew Orphans Home was located in Atlanta, Georgia. Founded in 1889, the Home took in Jewish children from across the Southeastern United States and taught them blue collar trades, such as plumbing, printmaking, and stenography. Although it ceased to be a residential facility in 1930, the Home continued to play an important role in Atlanta's Jewish community by providing adoption and foster home services. During World War II, the Home was responsible for placing Jewish refugee children with foster families in Georgia and Alabama. This organization is now known as the Jewish Education Loan Fund and provides interest-free loans for Jewish students throughout the Southeast.
    National Council of Jewish Women - Atlanta Section - See the main article for more information about this organization.

Works Cited

The Philip Lief Group. "My Jewish Learning: The American Jewish Committee."My Jewish Learning Home Page. http://www.myjewishlearning.com/history_community/Modern/ModernIntergroup/ModernAntisemitism/AJC.htm (accessed July 18, 2008)>

Sonnert, Gerhard and Holton, Gerald. What Happened to the Children Who Fled Nazi Persecution? New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers."United States Committee for the Care of European Children." Teaching Eleanor Roosevelt, ed. by Allida Black, June Hopkins, et. al. (Hyde Park, New York: Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, 2003). http://www.nps.gov/archive/elro/glossary/uscom.htm (Accessed July 3, 2008).

Wenger, Beth. The Jewish Americans: Three Centuries of Jewish Voices in America. New York: Doubleday, 2007.

The Nobel Foundation. American Friends Service Committee : The Nobel Peace Prize 1947 : History of Organization. The Nobel Prize Home Page. http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1947/friends-committee-history.html (accessed July 4, 2008).

Guide to the Records of the German-Jewish Children's Aid (GJCA) (1933 - 1953). YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. http://www.cjh.org/academic/findingaids/yivo/ncprc/GJCA.html (accessed July 2, 2008).

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "American Jewish Congress." Holocaust Encyclopedia. http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005683 (accessed July 2, 2008).

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Quakers." Holocaust Encyclopedia. http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/index.php?ModuleId=10005143 (accessed July 2, 2008).