Donating Materials to the Ida Pearle & Joseph Cuba Archives

Why Donate Materials to the Archives?

The Ida Pearle & Joseph Cuba Archives currently holds over 2,000 manuscript collections; over 15,000 photographs; 500 oral histories, of which 300 have been transcribed and catalogued; microfilm; newspapers; objects; and textiles.

Materials found in the Cuba Archives have been used by researchers, authors, documentary film producers, theaters, and by individuals trying to find out more about their family histories. Those materials form the basis for The Breman's signature exhibitions, Absence of Humanity: The Holocaust Years, and Creating Community: The Jews of Atlanta from 1845 to the Present.

Screen shot of the database with which

Screen shot of the database with which
the archivist tracks all of the holdings of
the archives.

Goals of the Archives

  • To collect and preserve the history of Jewish life in Georgia and Alabama;
  • To process, clean and store these collections in environmentally safe (humidity and temperature controlled) stacks; and
  • To catalogue the collections and make them available to researchers.

What is the Role of the Archives?

  • An archive insures that historically important items that illuminate Jewish life in Georgia and Alabama cannot get lost or destroyed.
  • An archive ensures that documents are cared for in a safe environment.
  • An archive allows easy access of processed and catalogued material.

The lack of appropriate storage facilities can result in the loss of the paper legacy and material culture of a community.

Storage issues can include environmental problems, such as mold, pests, and floods (unfortunately, not uncommon in Georgia).

 

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Confirmation class led by Rabbi Edmund A. Landau, Albany, Georgia.

Confirmation class led by Rabbi Edmund A. Landau, Albany, Georgia.

 

Stacks of The Cuba Archives

Stacks of The Cuba Archives

 

This detail from a large-scale fraternity photograph that was discovered in a flooded Atlanta basement. You can see how the mold has destroyed the emulsion on the surface of the photograph.

This detail from a large-scale fraternity photograph that was discovered in a flooded Atlanta basement. You can see how the mold has destroyed the emulsion on the surface of the photograph.

What is Archival Processing?

Archival processing is the act of arranging and describing the papers of an individual or family, or the records of an organization.

“Normal” storage procedures can have a negative impact on the longevity of important documents. When collections at The Breman are cleaned and processed, all paper clips, staples and pins, and rubber bands are removed.

The minutes in this notebook will be

The minutes in this notebook will be preserved in acid-neutral
folders.

Meeting minutes are removed from binders and 3-ring notebooks, then placed in acid-neutral folders in chronological order.

Documents are unfolded and flattened to prevent tearing.

Boxes and boxes and boxes of documents and minutes and financial records and photographs and correspondence and journals and scrap books and programs and invitations and religious school notices and congregational bulletins that come in looking like this…

Image of a messy box before processing.
Image of a perfectly organized file box.

...end up looking like this: a researcher's dream!

Friends in Macon, Georgia.

Why are we here?

What’s important to you may not be as important to your grandchildren or great-grandchildren.

PLEASE HELP US PRESERVE THE PAST!

For more information about how you can preserve your materials in the Cuba Archives, contact Sandy Berman at 404-870-1862 or by e-mail.

Read the Cuba Archives Collection Policies.

 

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Damage from a rusted paper clip in a minute book.

Damage from a rusted paper clip in a minute book.

Archivist Sandy Berman, carefully unfolding a document while processing a collection.

Archivist Sandy Berman, carefully unfolding a document while processing a collection.